Use case: Showing homes served by multiple grade levels

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This is part 5 of 6 in our series on using School Attendance Zones to solve user engagement and conversion challenges. Thanks for reading! So far in our series, we reviewed the ability to search for homes based on school ratings, visualize school coverage, tag listings to a particular school or district, and capture organic traffic. Our next topic for discussion is showing various ways a user can search for homes when they have children in various grades.

School attendance boundaries allow visitors with children of different grade levels to find a home that matches their need. An important question to engage visitors is to ask, “What grade is your child in?” Grade levels are crucial as they are not confined to elementary, middle, or high schools. Onboard's school data is categorized to mark these distinctions so you can search across grade levels.

One scenario is having a fourth and sixth grader. In one area that could mean the students will be attending the same elementary school. In another area, that could signify that the fourth grader will attend an elementary school while the sixth grader attends a middle school. The same goes for ninth grade; it could mean middle school in one area and high school in another.

One scenario of linking buyers to areas where they have multiple school-aged children is using a search by grade level. The website could also enable search for multiple schools.

With our school attendance boundaries, you have the ability to show a visitor homes,  depending on multiple schools selected by grade levels, and shade the overlapping area on a map. Another great implementation is showing a list of all homes that fall within requested schools.

Join us tomorrow for a discussion on how to keep buyers engaged as they make their decision by implementing email alerts on new properties in their school districts.

 

Update: To learn more, watch our new School Attendance Zones webinar, available for free streaming.

Image Credit: amyelizabethquinn on Pixabay.com